Study Reveals Predictors of Postoperative Complications in HIV-Infected Children Who Have Surgery

May 24, 2011

A study presented in the April 2011 edition of the Journal of Pediatric Surgery investigated the factors associated with complications in HIV-infected children undergoing surgical procedures.

The researchers conducted a prospective study of HIV-infected children who were younger than 60 months old who had a surgical procedure performed at a tertiary referral pediatric hospital. Eighty-two HIV-infected children, there with a median age of 11.5 months, were enrolled in the study. A four year time period was analyzed — from July 2004 to July 2008. The children were followed postoperatively to ascertain if any complications developed, the length of stay, and mortality.

The authors concluded that “young age and major surgery were the main predictors of complications in HIV-infected children undergoing surgery.” The results further showed that 40 of the 82 subjects (48.7%) had surgical site contamination at the time of the surgery.

[button link=”http://www.jpedsurg.org/article/S0022-3468(10)01015-8/abstract” window=”yes”]Click to read the abstract[/button]

Reference: Karpelowsky, J.S., Zar, H.J., van Bogerijen, G., van der Graaf, N., and A.J.W. Millar. (2011). Predictors of Postoperative Complications in HIV-Infected Children Undergoing Surgery. Journal of Pediatric Surgery, 46(4):674-678.

 

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